Archive for the ‘Regional Film’ Category

Lost in Light Launches

Friday, January 5th, 2007

Jennifer Proctor and Aaron Valdez’s Lost in Light project website has officially launched. If you missed my post about it in October, the project is “devoted to preserving, archiving, and making available 8mm and Super 8 films that are otherwise being lost to time.”

Now that the project has begun, Jennifer and Aaron are ready to start accepting Super 8 and 8mm films for free transfer to video and inclusion on their videoblog. They are also accepting creative works made in Super 8 and 8mm for posting to the site.

Click here to find out more about having your Super-8 and “regular” 8mm movies transferred to video for free. The transfers they’re offering are flickerless, and they look good. Check out their first post to see a sample.

If you’re interested in submitting creative work, click here.

Lost in Light

Friday, October 27th, 2006

A few weeks ago, in an effort to show my students some of the more interesting film and video work being created for the web I discovered Have Money Will Vlog. It’s an ingenious site that helps media artists raise funds to produce their web-distributed videos and films. The project budgets are in the $2000 – $3000 range, and the donations are usually small — $10, $20, and so on. Of course, that money adds up when you consider all the people online.

You get what you pay for, too. The work you’ll find on HMWV is about, oh, a zillion times better than anything you’ll see on YouTube or Google Video. (Unless, of course, you have some predilection for watching pre-teens doing karaoke in front of their webcams.)

Anyway, if you’ve not yet run across Have Money Will Vlog, now is a particularly good time to check out the site (and to dig in your pocket for some loose change) because funds are currently being raised for a project by Jennifer Proctor and Aaron Valdez, two Iowa City filmmakers. The project is called Lost in Light and, in Jennifer’s words (via email) the project is “devoted to preserving, archiving, and making available 8mm and Super 8 films that are otherwise being lost to time.”

In fact, as they state on the Lost in Light websites (HMWV site, official site), “we will provide free Super 8 and 8mm to video transfers to anyone who asks, in exchange for posting their video to the Lost in Light site and on the Internet Archive with their choice of Creative Commons licenses. In addition, Lost in Light will include articles and features by members of the filmmaking and film preservation communities, video tutorials for making 8mm films, as well as creative work, all with the goal of preserving and championing this important film format.”

So, send them your Super-8 and 8mm films. And send them some $ while you’re at it.

Home Movie Day (Richmond Edition)

Sunday, August 13th, 2006

The Richmond edition of Home Movie Day, which was run by the Richmond Moving Image Co-op, was great fun. There was a nice turnout and everyone attending (myself included) learned some good tips about preserving their small gauge films.

For Ashley’s complete write-up, including an explanation of what James Parrish of RMIC is explaining to her, click on the photo.

 

 

Small Gauge Madness: Home Movie Day

Wednesday, August 9th, 2006

August 12 is Home Movie Day. As part of the festivities, small-gauge film-related events will be held in 27 states and 6 countries this year.

This is the first I’ve heard of it, but apparently Home Movie Day is in its fourth year. Here’s some information from the website:

Home Movie Day was started in 2002 by a group of film archivists concerned about what would happen to all the home movies shot on film during the 20th century….

The Home Movie Day founders envisioned a worldwide celebration of these amateur films, during which people in cities and towns all over would get to meet local film archivists, find out about the long-term benefits of film versus video and digital media, and—most importantly—get to watch those old family films! Because they are local events, Home Movie Day screenings can focus on family and community histories in a meaningful way. They are also an education and outreach opportunity for local archivists, who can share information about proper storage and care for personal films, and how to make plans for their future.

Great stuff. If you happen to go to one of the events, post a comment and let us know how it went. My ladyfriend and I are hoping to attend the one in Richmond.

On a related note, if you’ve got a lot of 8mm or Super-8 movies that you need to have transferred to video, check back tomorrow.

No Time to Waste: 48-Hour PSA Project

Tuesday, August 1st, 2006

A while back I wrote about a 48 hour documentary project, now along comes a 48-hour PSA project that is the brainchild of Asian Arts Initiative Executive Director Gayle Isa and Sara Zia Ebrahimi, who shared some thoughts on this site about film co-ops.

Because of the meetings, the event is largely Philadelphia-based, but if you’re interested in participating you might send them an email (info below) to inquire if you can play along. (They’re planning on uploading to BlipTV, after all.)

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