Archive for the ‘Regional Film’ Category

For Memories’ Sake

Sunday, June 28th, 2009

The last couple of months have been pretty darn busy, so blogging has taken a backseat. I’ve been working on a few different projects — some writing, a DVD of two short films, and some tests with a new camera. And I got married — eloped to Walden Pond, to be precise. It’s been good to have some downtime from the blog, but now I’m back.

I’ll have some more information about some of these projects of mine later this summer, and I’ll be making some changes (hopefully good ones!) to Self-Reliant Film as well. But for now, I want to announce the launch of the For Memories’ Sake website.

For Memories’ Sake is a new half-hour documentary directed by my wife, Ashley Maynor. I’m the film’s producer and, though we’re still in the latter stages of post-production on it, I have to say I’m about as proud of this movie as anything I’ve been involved with.

In the coming days, as we complete the movie and prepare it for distribution, Ashley will be blogging on SRF about some of the things that were involved in making the film. Until then, I encourage you to become a “fan” of the movie on Facebook and check out the aforementioned website.

Wyoming Film Contest

Thursday, March 26th, 2009

I usually don’t post film contest, and especially film festival, deadlines and guidelines. There are just too many out there to keep up with it all. But the Wyoming Film Contest got my attention. First, I like to promote regional cinema efforts. Secondly, the winner receives $25,000 towards producing a feature film (in Wyoming, ‘natch).

You don’t have to be from Wyoming or live there to enter the contest, but your film must “reference Wyoming in some way.”

Visit the Wyoming Film Office’s blog for more details.

joinmycrew.com

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

SRF reader Jeremy Parker recently alerted me to a website he’s been building called Join My Crew.

Just as it sounds, it’s a completely free website that hopes to help independent filmmakers find cast and crew for their next productions. The site Beta launched last week and will only get better as more and more filmmakers start to use the site.

IndieMemphis: Quick Feet, Soft Hands, etc.

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

Quick Feet, Soft Hands will be screening at IndieMemphis this weekend. If you’ve not seen it and you’re in the area, check it out on Sunday.

Sadly, I won’t be able to attend. Instead I’ve got to run to D.C. to do some final post-production work on the Quick Feet television version, which I need to deliver to ITVS by the end of the month.

In addition to missing all the great films that IM’s new festival director Erik Jambor has selected, I’m also bummed that I’m missing out on an all-to-infrequent opportunity to feast on authentic Memphis BBQ.

If this year’s IndieMemphis is any indication, Jambor is going to do great things for the festival as it chugs into its second decade. Hopefully I’ll be able to be there with the next one. To all that attend — enjoy!

Louis Massiah/Scribe Video Center

Monday, September 15th, 2008

Louis Massiah, acclaimed documentarian and community video pioneer, visited Virginia Tech a few days ago. What an inspiration.

Among the works Massiah screened was a segment from Power!, one episode from the Eyes on the Prize II series. In the segment, we are told the story of Carl B. Stokes, the first black mayor of a major American city. To say this video — produced in the 80s, about a man that broke ground in the 60s — was timely would be an understatement. If you want insight into this year’s presidential election, including the racial (and racist) strategies being employed by opponents of Barack Obama, it’s a must-see. (Search for it in a local library here.)

Still, even more impressive, was hearing Massiah discuss and screen work produced by Scribe Video Center. Massiah founded Scribe in 1982, and occupies a central place in Philadelphia media-making. If you don’t know about it and you’re interested in community storytelling (and empowerment) through video, dig into their website. Scribe has been around for 26 years, which is a phenomenal achievement, particularly considering the fate of so many other media arts organizations (from the Film Arts Foundation to AIVF). More importantly, they’ve changed lives through storytelling. Great stuff.