Archive for the ‘Business’ Category

UFVA Panel – “Self-Reliant Filmmaking”

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

I am in New Orleans at the University Film & Video Association conference. Today I moderated a panel on Self-Reliant Filmmaking. There was a good crowd and, as often happens with these things, the discussion just scraped the tip of the iceberg.

The panelists were:

Paul Harrill, Virginia Tech. Moderator.
Sasha Waters, University of Iowa.
Jennifer Proctor, Grand Valley State University.
Bob Hurst, University of Kansas.

As promised, I am posting links to many of the articles and resources discussed by the panelists and myself. If this is your first time visiting Self-Reliant Film, I encourage you to sift through the posts, especially the first post, which lays out some of the points made in my discussion today, and the resources page.

Paul Harrill: Panel Opening Remarks

Yes, The Sky is Really Falling” by Mark Gill
Welcome to the New World of Distribution by Peter Broderick

Workbook Project – website led by Lance Weiler that “bridges the gap between tech and entertainment”

CinemaTech – Scott Kirsner’s blog about “digital cinema, democratization, and other trends remaking the movies”

Self-Distribution Case Studies:
Power to the Pixel conference presentation: Brave New Films
Power to the Pixel conference presentation:Four Eyed Monsters

Panelist Sasha Waters:

Be Fake, Remake – group blog featuring work from Sasha Waters’ Remake Seminar

Panelist Jennifer Proctor:

Jennifer Proctor: home page (see “Teaching Materials“)

Center for Social Media – Best Practices for Fair Use in Online Video

Vimeo — a video hosting community

Student work shown:
Anna Gustafson, “Woman
Evan Rattenbury, “Land O’ Dreams
Josh Carlson, “Donkeys vs. Elephants

Sita Sings the Blues is out on DVD. How, I’m still not sure.

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

Sita Sings the Blues, the critically acclaimed animated feature film single-handedly made by Nina Paley, is being released on DVD today. For those that haven’t been following the story, the film’s use of uncleared, copyrighted musical compositions has restricted the film’s release.

Today, indieWire reports that “[t]hrough an intense study of copyright laws, Paley has realized the opportunity to allow other people to sell her work with her endorsement, and she can receive donations from these distributors.”

But the author of the article does not mention the legal conclusions that Paley (and her lawyers) arrived at, nor does the article make any mention of the source for this information.

One website that is acknowledged is QuestionCopyright, which has a lengthy interview with Paley. The comments section that follows the interview is worth a read, too, as there’s a lot of back-and-forth between commenters supporting Paley’s attempts to produce “new work” (as copyright law is supposed to encourage) and several other others that argue that blame Paley for the situation at hand.

Unfortunately, I still don’t have answers about how Paley and her lawyers have decided to release the film on DVD. Perhaps it’s because they’re also giving it away via torrent?

If you want to buy the DVD, it’s available here.

UPDATE: See the comments for answers….

This one’s for the graduates…

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

Reader (and former student) Jonathan Poritsky writes in:

I’ve replied to enough “your-dad-said-you-work-in-film-what-should-i-do-now?” e-mails that I got tired of it and decided to write the response to end all responses. It seemed relevant to SRF, and also in part inspired by what you do on your site. So here’s the link, do with it what you will…

I will link to it. Here it is: Starting Out in Film, Now What?

How to make a screenings map with Google

Sunday, May 17th, 2009

After my recent post, which mapped out the past and upcoming Quick Feet, Soft Hands television screenings, some folks at ITVS asked if I wouldn’t mind sharing how I made the map so that they could encourage other filmmakers they work with to do the same.

Though I’m far from the first person to do this sort of thing, I was, of course, happy to oblige. It’s a great way to visually communicate with your audience about when and where they can see your work.

(more…)

Scott Kirsner’s ITVS Case Studies

Monday, January 26th, 2009

A few weeks ago Scott Kirsner blogged about a series of case studies he recently authored regarding independent filmmakers connecting with their audiences. Commissioned by ITVS, the case studies focus on, as Scott puts it,

indie filmmakers who are pioneering new ways to:

– Open up the production process to more audience participation

– Find and connect with new audiences for their work

– Distribute their finished film in new ways.

While all of the case studies focus on documentaries, there are a lot of insights here that are not limited to any one genre. In fact, I’ve made these case studies required reading in the Movie Business class that I teach at Virginia Tech. If you read this blog, chances are they should be required reading for you, too.

Read Scott’s introductory blog post. Or go straight to the case studies.