Archive for the ‘Production’ Category

Red One – Information Page

Saturday, April 5th, 2008

I’ve read a lot of stuff on the web in my efforts to educate myself about the Red One digital cinema camera’s new approach to motion picture image capture and its workflow. Below are some of the better resources I’ve encountered. If I’ve left off something helpful, let me know in the comments.

***

COMPANY WEBSITE

    Red Digital Cinema Camera Company

RED DISCUSSION FORUMS

    Reduser.net
    The Red company-sponsored site.

    Creative Cow Red Forum
    Mostly oriented around Red post-production workflow.

    Cinematography.com Red Forum
    Lots of skepticism and passionate disagreement about the Red here.

    DV Info.net Red Forum
    Infrequent posting; lots of overlap with reduser.

WIKIS

    Redhax.net: a wiki for Red users. Very incomplete, but useful in spots.

    Wikipedia:Red Digital Camera Company entry

RED: BASICS

    Octamas.com: Red One user menu guides

    FresHDV: “All Things Red” – another links listing

    Creative Cow: Dress for Success with RED

    Creative Cow: Shooting with RED: Testing, testing…

SHOOTING RAW:

    ProLost: Exposing to the Left vs. Exposing to the Right

    Pro Lost: Digital Cinema Dynamic Range — an epic post

    Pro Lost: Digital Cinema Dynamic Range [abbreviated version]

    Reduser.net: Thread on Working with RAW

    Bealecorner: John Beale’s camera tests

WORKFLOW:

    American Cinema Editors: Podcast discussion for A.C.E. members about the workflow for Red with Avid and Final Cut Pro.

    RedHax Wiki: Footage Protocol on Set

    RedHax Wiki: Footage Conversion

    Editors Lounge: Handling Red One in Post-Production [link to page with pdf file]

    Coremelt: Red Camera 10-bit Color Online Workflow with FCP 6.0.2

    PVC: Working with Red Footage

    DV Magazine: Posting RED

    Scott Simmons’ Editblog: posts tagged “red”

    Indie4k: Red Workflow posts 1 and 2

    Pro8mm: Red & Super-8 Telecine (!)

ONLINE TUTORIAL/DEMO VIDEOS

    Wonderhowto: Learn All About the Red One Camera – 12 videos!

    Studio Daily: Shooting Red

    Studio Daily: What You Can Do with Red Alert

    Studio Daily: Final Cut Pro – Red Workflow

    Studio Daily: Edit RED Footage in Avid Media Composer

    Studio Daily: RED / Avid Workflow

    Studio Daily: Maintaining Red Metadata to Avid

    Studio Daily: Assimilate Scratch / Red Workflow

    FX Guide TV: Workflow with Red Episodes 1 and 2

Official REDCINE Training Videos

    Interface Overview
    Project Settings
    Shot Settings
    Color Settings
    Output Settings
    Library

FOOTAGE

    Red Relay
    Repository of Red One footage.

PODCASTS

    RedCentre @ FX Guide
    Weekly podcast on all things Red from FXGuide.

RED 3rd-PARTY SOFTWARE

    Crimson Workflow
    FCP round tripping application.

    RedTrip
    Essentially an early, free version of Crimson Workflow.

    Red Portal
    Allows you to double-click R3D files to open in RedAlert!

    AliasRDC
    Helps with footage conversion (see http://www.redhax.net/wiki/Footage_Conversion).

    MetaCheater
    Allows MetaData use in Avid.

    Spotlight Plugin for R3D Files
    Lets you easily find and identify r3d-files on your computer.

3rd PARTY ACCESSORIES

    Element Technica

    Sim Video

***

Some might ask why this site is posting about Red, considering it is, for many readers, a high-ticket item (especially when you add in the cost of lenses, support, etc.). My answer is that this is a site that’s devoted to all forms of maverick filmmaking, including the invention of maverick filmmaking tools. By this standard, Red certainly qualifies.

Panasonic HVX-200 for sale…

Thursday, January 17th, 2008

I’m selling my venerable Panasonic HVX-200 and its 8GB P2 card. No, I’m not giving up filmmaking; I just don’t need the camera. I was looking to rent an HVX this summer for a few weeks to do some shooting in Knoxville and Roanoke. For the few weeks I needed it, a rental wasn’t really cost-effective, so I just bit the bullet and bought the camera. Now that we’ve got a few HVX’s at Virginia Tech, I don’t need to hang on to this one. As many people who read this blog would probably testify, it is an awesome camera. The DVCPro HD codec at 24P is totally impressive.

Anyway, if you’re interested, email me personally [ pharrill AT you-know-what DOT com ]. You can ask me all about it and I can let you know all the details, accessories, etc. I’d rather sell it to a reader of SRF than put it up on Ebay, so I’ll entertain any reasonable, sincere offer.

UPDATE: Looks like it’s sold folks. Thanks for your interest!

Gels, and their Proper Care

Tuesday, December 11th, 2007

Gels are useful, but pricey. Any budget-minded filmmaker should take good care of them. Here’s a helpful post from David Tames at Kino-Eye that details some simple ways to organize your gels so that they last longer.

Dimmer Boxes

Sunday, November 11th, 2007

When I was looking through the new edition of The Filmmaker’s Handbook, I noticed a lot of little changes and additions. An example: In a list of equipment to bring to the set, in the lighting category I noticed one addition: “dimmer boxes.” I can’t argue with that — dimmer boxes help one light with finesse, and they’re fairly easy to come by.

I went to the trouble of making a couple dimmers (aka “hand squeezers”) myself about a year and a half ago. I made a couple of 600 watt boxes, as well as a 1000 watt box. The supplies I got from the local home improvement store, though I remember that the 1000w dimmer was not widely available. If I remember correctly, I built all three dimmer for about $100 in supplies. They would have been cheaper, but the 1000w dimmer was considerably more expensive than the 600w.

In retrospect, instead of making those boxes, I would have been better off simply purchasing one of the many dimmer boxes or router speed controls (which can be used as a dimmer box) that are commercially available. They’re cheaper, they’re probably more reliable than anything I could build, and the heavy duty router speed controls can handle more power than the ones I built. Plus, the router speed controls have a safety fuse, which my self-built dimmers lack.

Shopping for some last week, I ran across lots of varieties. Here are some:

Dimmer Boxes:

Ikea Dimma – 300 Watts and under – $7.95
Note: Not useful for most motion picture lights, but if you just need something for practicals, these are nice and cheap.

Smith Victor – DC-1 Dimmer Control – 600 Watts and under – $23.95

Router Speed Controls:

Harbor Freight Tools – 15 Amps and lower – $19.99

MLCS Router Speed Control – 15 Amps and lower – $20.95 and $28.95, respectively, for the “home” and “industrial/commercial” use boxes

Grizzly G3555 Router Speed Control – 20 Amps and lower – $31.50

Rockler Router Speed Control – 20 Amps and lower – $39.99

If, however, you wish to build your own, you can find instructions in Blain Brown’s Motion Picture and Video Lighting, 2nd Edition (p. 241) and, of course, there are plans aplenty on the ‘net.

Pulling Focus

Tuesday, October 16th, 2007

Focus is such a downright elemental part of the filmmaking process that it’s often taken for granted. Like sound, most moviegoers only notice it when it’s bad.

Aside from the occasional rack-focus, the work of a good 1st AC (or whoever’s pulling the focus) probably shouldn’t call attention to itself. And yet it’s work that takes nimble hands, good eyes, and a near-balletic sense of timing and movement.

I enjoyed FresHDV’s latest 3-part tutorial with Bob Sanchez on The Art of Focus Pulling, in which the FresHDV guys document Sanchez revealing how he approaches his work and some tricks of the trade.

Here are the links:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Aside from learning some things, after watching the series I went away appreciating even more how, when it’s done right, the craft/art of it is simultaneously invisible and right before your eyes. How’s that for a paradox?

Update from Matt Jeppsen of FresHDV:

When we posted the last clip in our three-part “Art of Pulling Focus” series, I had quite a few people e-mail me and specifically ask for a quicktime and/or HD version. Well at long last, here it is. We’re sharing the 15-min Part 3 hands-on demonstration video as a 720p H.264 clip, available here.