Freeware, Shareware, and Cheap Mac Software for Filmmakers

December 31st, 2015

It’s been a long time since we’ve done a post that wasn’t related to Something, Anything. Back in 2007 (!), I did a post on shareware for filmmakers. That’s still the first hit you get if you google the term. So I figured it was time to do an update.

Looking over this list, it’s kind of remarkable what kind of tools you can assemble for very, very little money.

Happy New Year!



Audacity: Free. From the audacity website: “Easy-to-use, multi-track audio editor and recorder for Windows, Mac OS X, GNU/Linux and other operating systems.”

Audio Hijack: $49. Allows you to record any streaming audio. Useful for all sorts of things — skype interviews, etc. Also, you may want to compare Fission (Rogue Amoeba’s $29 audio editor) against Audacity.


DaVinci Resolve

DaVinci Resolve 12: Free and Paid versions. Resolve would be on this list alone because it’s an industry-standard color grading app. What’s equally amazing is that it’s now a very useable NLE. When Apple introduced Final Cut Pro X and abandoned its venerable (but aging) Final Cut Pro 7, there was a seismic shift in the NLE landscape. Some people moved to Premiere Pro, others moved to Avid, and some adopted FCPX. I clung to FCP 7 in hopes that something would come along that was less buggy (and better supported) than Premiere, more intuitive than Avid, and more “traditional” (for lack of a better word) than FCP X. DaVinci Resolve is not perfect, but it’s elegantly designed, and the free version does 90% of what the paid version does. And of course, it’s a must have for the grading tools alone.



Apple Compressor: $50. Apple’s venerable Compressor app (part of its old Final Cut Studio suite) got a make-over when FCP X was introduced a few years ago. Now an affordable standalone app, it’s $50 and works pretty well. Users of Adobe Creative Cloud (which includes Adobe Media Encoder) probably don’t have a use for this, but some people (I’m one) still prefer it. VLC, Handbrake, and MPEG Streamclip (all below) are other alternatives, but I tend to go with Compressor.

MPEG Streamclip: Free. In their own words, MPEG streamclip is a “free video converter, player, editor for Mac and Windows. It can play many movie files, not only MPEGs; it can convert MPEG files between muxed/demuxed formats for authoring; it can encode movies to many formats, including iPod; it can cut, trim and join movies. MPEG Streamclip can also download videos from YouTube and Google by entering the page URL.”

Handbrake: Free. From the Handbrake website: “HandBrake is a tool for converting video from nearly any format to a selection of modern, widely supported codecs.”



Celtx: Free (for scriptwriting app only; other features are paid). I teach first-time screenwriting students, and this is the app I always send them to because it’s free. There are paid upgrades if you want additional features (scheduling and so on). But I’ve not tried those, and I’d be reluctant to use them over Scenechronize (see below). My favorite screenwriting app is Fade In (see immediately below), but this gets the job done if you have absolutely no money.

Fade In

Fade In: $50. This isn’t shareware, but it’s affordably priced, especially considering the competition. The best, and simplest, screenwriting app I’ve ever encountered — and I’ve paid for Adobe Story, Final Draft (vers 6, 7, and 8) Movie Magic Screenwriter, and several other also-rans (plus Celtx). Fade In works with files from other screenwriting apps flawlessly, in my experience. You can import files from Final Draft, Fountain, Celtx, Adobe Story, Scrivener, PDF, and plain text, among others. The interface is just what I want: It looks good, it puts a focus on the words, and it’s easy to navigate through the script. I actually LIKE using it. There’s also an iPad app. Unfortunately it’s not nearly as solid.

Scrivener: $45. Like Fade In, this isn’t shareware. But it is an awesome tool for keeping notes, research, and drafts in order as you prep a project. The one downside is that the developer has been promising an iPad version for years, and during that time people have been leaving the app for other competitors (like Ulysses).

Libre Office and Open Office: Free. These are essentially open source versions of the applications you find in Microsoft Office. (Do I really need to explain what you’d use these for?) Anyway, some people prefer Libre Office, others prefer Open Office. My day job supplies me with a free copy of MS Office, so I don’t have much of an opinion. They’re both free — download them both and give each a spin. Of course, another option is to work in the cloud using Google Docs (see below).



App Cleaner: Free. If you’re reading this, you probably like trying new apps. The problem is that when you install new software hidden files and folders often get installed all over your computer. App Cleaner the easiest way to thoroughly uninstall unwanted apps. I use this all the time.

Super Duper: Free / $28 and Carbon Copy Cloner: $40. Backups are essential, and these are two great backup and disk-cloning solutions. I far prefer either to Apple’s Time Machine (which is a different thing altogether). I use SuperDuper, but Carbon Copy Cloner is very good too.

Cyberduck: Donationware. As the website states, Cyberduck is a “FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, S3, Azure & OpenStack Swift browser for Mac and Windows.” My go-to app for FTP stuff.

Movie Thumbnails

Movie Thumbnails: $3.99. This is really one of the best-kept secrets on the list. Movie Thumbnails lets you “create an overview or contact sheet of a movie combined with metadata like resolution, codec details and so forth.” We used this app to create contact sheets for every video file shot on Something, Anything, which helped us check on the wardrobe continuity or lighting for a shot from previous days of filming. Invaluable!

Pacifist: $20 shareware. This is one of those apps that you may only use once or twice, but you’ll be so glad it exists when you need it. Basically it allows you to drill down into Mac software packages to extract a single file from an installer. You may think you have no need for it, but like I said, it’s great at what it does.

QuickTime Movie NoteTaker: Free. Honestly, I’m not sure if this is still supported, and I confess I’ve not needed to use it in years.But this made the list last time and it might help someone out, so I’m listing putting here.

Self-Control: Free. The internet is a factory of distractions. If you don’t trust yourself to stay focused on that screenplay, use Self-Control to shut off the internet for a while. It works.

Transcriva: $30. Transcription software for the Mac. I’ve not used this in a while, and some folks are using their NLE’s voice recognition software, but it’s still useful. While looking at Transcriva again I ran across Express Scribe — never used it, but it also worth a look if you need something like this.

White Noise Free: Free. I get distracted if I can hear random conversations, music, etc. while doing deep dive work (e.g., writing or editing). Listening to white noise and a pair of good headphones helps me stay focused.

VLC Media Player: Free. From the website: “VLC is a free and open source cross-platform multimedia player and framework that plays most multimedia files as well as DVDs, Audio CDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols.” Plays almost anything you throw at it. We use this to cue up trailers at Public Cinema screenings.



This could be a really long list, but here are a few that I use.


Scenechronize: Free and Paid versions. I used to use a very old academic edition of Movie Magic/EP Scheduling, which is really expensive, to do stripboards and scheduling. Then a few years ago we discovered this. We used the free version of Scenechronize on Something, Anything, and it was amazing. It’s so amazing that I’ve bumped it to the top of this section, out of alphabetical order. The paid version allows teams to collaborate.

Dropbox and Copy: Free and Paid versions. You know what Dropbox is. Copy is pretty much the same thing. There are lots of other web apps out there that do what these two do. When Something, Anything started being invited to festivals, each one would ask for their own set of (sometimes unique) deliverables. Instead of using Dropbox (which I use for tons of other things) I created a new Copy account and created files for each festival. This kept things clean and organized. Again, you could do this with one service (like Dropbox) but with so many players in the free cloud storage area, why not use a few?

Google Apps: Sheets and Forms. Free. I’m ambivalent about cloud computing (as in, it really sucks if you lose internet service), but I use Google’s Spreadsheet and Survey apps quite a bit. We used the spreadsheet app to keep track of everything from casting information to festival submissions to publications to approach for reviews or other coverage. Google Surveys are great, too. We used them one, for example, at the beginning of Something, Anything to poll our crew about dietary restrictions, medical conditions, and so on.

WordPress: Free. Many a great website was built on the back of WordPress. (In case you’re interested, this site is built on WP; Something, Anything‘s site is SquareSpace. SquareSpace will cost you money, maybe too much money, but it’s appealingly no fuss.)


Blender: Free. Blender is used for, as the website says, “3D computer graphics software used for creating animated films, visual effects, art, 3D printed models, interactive 3D applications and video games.” If you’ve ever seen my films you might suspect I know virtually nothing about this stuff. And you’d be right.

Lightworks: Free and Pro (Paid) Versions Lightworks was one of the first non-linear editors, and it’s been used to edit films like The Wolf of Wall Street, LA Confidential, Pulp Fiction, Heat, and Road to Perdition. You can compare the free and paid versions here. After Apple’s FCP debacle in 2011, I was curious about exploring this, but by the time the Mac version of Lightworks was released Resolve had emerged as a NLE candidate.

Evernote: Free and Paid versions. I’ve never been a convert, but some people — especially writers — are almost cultish in their devotion to Evernote.


Hopefully this post introduced you to one or more apps that helps you be more creative and productive. If you like something that I’ve not listed, or have thoughts on any of the above, let me know in the comments, via email, on Twitter, etc.

The Music of Something, Anything

May 17th, 2015

We’ve received a lot of messages asking about the music in Something, Anything, so here’s some information about how to hear it. Alas, we can’t release a soundtrack to the film because, though we have rights to the music in the film soundtrack rights are another thing altogether.

That said, you can make your own at home using these links to the iTunes store. Some of these songs will be available on Spotify or Youtube, too. Purchasing music, however, is the best way to support artists, so that’s we’ve provided iTunes links.

Two things to note:

Eric V. Hachikian composed three original piano compositions for the film — the opening credits music, the music that plays while Peggy writes in her journal the first time, and the music that plays at the end of the film. They’re beautiful compositions and we were honored to have him compose them for the film, but they are not currently available for purchase or streaming.

The last two songs on this list are the original versions of the songs used in the film. We had new recordings done of those songs.

“Enchante” – Donald Brown

Easley Said and Done” – Donald Brown

“Seekers of The Truth #12” – Cecil Lytle

“Easter Hymn” – Cecil Lytle

“Easter Night Procession” – Cecil Lytle

“The Healer” – Ben Sollee

“The Law” – Emily Jane White

“Dead Town” – The Vaygues Not available on iTunes, but found on YouTube via the supplied link.

“Get Left In the Dark” – Nerves Junior Note: This is the vocal version of the song. We use an instrumental version in the film, but as far as we know that version isn’t commercially available.

“Know You Now” – The Someloves Note: This is the original recording from the 1980s. The song was covered by (now-defunct) Knoxville band The Young in the film, but that version is not commercially available.

“Vultures” – The Pass

“Where Did I Go Wrong?” – Dead Moon

“You Just Don’t Feel That Way About Me” – Bevis Frond

“Franklyn” – Michael Nyman Notes: This is Michael Nyman’s original recording of his composition. In the film the composition is performed by Tracy Cowden, but that version is not commercially available.


Something, Anything – By the Numbers

April 5th, 2015

A year ago today, Something, Anything had its world premiere at the Wisconsin Film Festival. Today, the film is available on iTunes, Google Play, Amazon, Vimeo, and Netflix. To commemorate an incredible, and exhausting, year of sharing the film with audiences here are some fun facts.

Something, Anything… by the numbers

22,474: miles traveled screening the film from April 2014 (premiere) to February 2015 (end of fest travel)

3333: days between emailing inquiry to Abbey of Gethsemani (first day of research for script) to world premiere (Wisconsin Film Festival)

961: gigabytes of original footage (AVCHD codec, in case you’re interested)

371: days between first day of principal photography and last day of principal photography (August 14, 2011 – August 20, 2012)

159: runtime of the film’s first assembly edit

127: scenes in final draft of screenplay

100+: actresses seen during casting for role of Margaret

88: runtime of film’s final cut

71: dollars paid on Ebay for the main lens used to shoot the film (Nikon 50mm f/1.8 Series E)

58: locations filmed

57: Facebook posts on since April 2014.

33: speaking roles

24: music cues

14: festivals and cinematheque selections (as of April 5, 2015)

8: number of times Paul Harrill and Ashley Maynor moved from pre-production through post-production

7: average number of crew members (largest crew size was 14; smallest was 1).

6: different camera models used on various occasions through production

5: attempts made to film synchronized fireflies before succeeding

4: babies born to crew and cast members during the film’s production, post, and distribution

3 and 1/2: stars (out of 4) given to film by critic Michal Oleszczyk in his review on

2: number of weeks Something, Anything was in Netflix’s Top 50 streaming movies according to website

1: scenes in which the character of Peggy/Margaret (Ashley Shelton) does not appear in the film


January 21st, 2015

Paul here.

I’m honored to announce that Something, Anything was released digitally today in partnership with the Sundance Institute. The film is available for purchase and/or rent on iTunes and Google Play immediately and will be released on Amazon in the near future. It’s also now available on Vimeo On Demand.

The head of the trail where we filmed our first shots.

The head of the trail where we filmed our first shots.

I started writing this film in earnest in late 2009. Soon thereafter Ashley Maynor joined the journey. Then, starting in 2011, many others came along to help bring it to life. We worked on it, on and off, for a long time before it finally premiered in April 2014. It took so long to make that we joked that it wasn’t a film; it was a lifestyle. And when we were making it we honestly had no idea if anyone would ever see it. That’s the truth.

Since last April I have had the remarkable fortune to travel with the film, meeting and talking with people who have been touched by it. Earlier this month the film screened for a week in New York and was reviewed, warmly, by critics and publications I’ve read for years. And, now, today it has been released out into the world. Anyone that wants it can download it now.

Thinking about this movie’s digital ones and zeros — files that were stored only on my solitary computer for so long — now transferring through wires and cables onto others’ computers, maybe even your own… It is very strange. It is also a little bittersweet. But mostly what I feel is a kind of sweet relief, which I can only liken to the feeling you get when you finally sit down after hiking through the woods for a long, long time.

Something, Anything: Screenings and Screen Forward Guests

January 3rd, 2015

We’re very excited about Something, Anything‘s Screen Forward run in New York at IFP’s Made in NY Media Center. Opening night is Friday, January 9 and it runs daily through Thursday, January 15.


Follow this link to purchase tickets!

We’ll be having several special guests join us after the screenings to discuss films and filmmaking. Below are several trailers and other links so that you can learn more about our guests, in case you’re not familiar with them.



Something, Anything followed by a Q+A moderated by filmmaker Daniel Carbone of Hide Your Smiling Faces


SATURDAY, JANUARY 10 @ 2:00 PM and 4:30 PM

Following the 4:30 PM screening there will be a roundtable discussion featuring producers Ashley Maynor (Something, Anything), Summer Shelton (Little Accidents),  Lucas Joaquin (The Heart Machine, Love Is Strange), and Tory Lenosky (Keep the Lights On).





Post-screening conversation on Contemplative & Spiritual Cinema, with writer/director Paul Harrill and Caveh Zahedi (The Sheik and I; actor, Waking Life) and filmmaker and critic Dan Sallitt (The Unspeakable Act).



Post-screening conversation between Something, Anything cinematographer Kunitaro Ohi and cinematographer Daryl Pittman (White Reindeer).



Followed by a post-screening Q+A with writer/director Paul Harrill, producer Ashley Maynor, and lead actress Ashley Shelton. Moderated by film critic Alissa Wilkinson, who interviewed Paul Harrill about Something, Anything for Christianity Today. Read the interview here.



Tennessee Film Night with writer/director Paul Harrill, producer Ashley Maynor and fellow makers of movies set/shot/connected to the Volunteer State — Tim Sutton (Memphis) and John Henry Summerour (Sahkanaga).