Author Archive

pCAM for iPhone

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

David Eubank’s pCAM and pCINE were great applications for the Palm OS. They helped you compute depth of field, hyperfocal distance, angle of view…. Together, they were like a computerized version of all those charts in the American Cinematographer’s Manual that you always referred to on set.

Now, Eubank has outdone himself with pCAM for iPhone, which combines the pCAM and pCINE applications in a new interface. If you have an iPhone and you shoot film or video, this is a supremely useful tool. At $39.99 it may seem pricey for an iPhone app, but in my opinion it’s well worth the price.

pCAM for iPhone [iTunes store link]

DIY project: Car Dash Camera Mount

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

I’ve not posted a DIY film tool link in a long time, but the Car Dash Camera Mount listed in this morning’s “Weekend Builder” email from Instructables grabbed my attention.

If you need a way to film yourself (or someone) straight-on while driving, this could be pretty useful. Unless, of course, you’re using a big-ish or heavy camera… in which case you probably can afford to rent the “proper” tools.

Wyoming Film Contest

Thursday, March 26th, 2009

I usually don’t post film contest, and especially film festival, deadlines and guidelines. There are just too many out there to keep up with it all. But the Wyoming Film Contest got my attention. First, I like to promote regional cinema efforts. Secondly, the winner receives $25,000 towards producing a feature film (in Wyoming, ‘natch).

You don’t have to be from Wyoming or live there to enter the contest, but your film must “reference Wyoming in some way.”

Visit the Wyoming Film Office’s blog for more details.

Fat Tuesday: The Order of Myths

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

I’ve been meaning to catch up with The Order of Myths since for about a year now, and tonight is my chance: it premieres on Independent Lens (check local listings). In case you aren’t familiar with its subject, here’s a summary:

Mobile, Alabama threw its first Mardi Gras more than 300 years ago; since then the party has been trying to stay true to tradition. But tradition gets tricky when it comes to race and class.

Separate but unequal royal courts preside—one queen, from a family of outlaw slave traders, the other, a descendent of runaway slaves. Beneath the surface of pageantry lies a complex story about race relations and the ever-present racial divide that persists in America today.

Read more about the TV premiere here. Film website is here.

[hat tip: Agnes Varnum]

Moved. Moving. Moves.

Wednesday, February 18th, 2009

I took a blog-holiday for a few weeks while my lady and I moved out of one house and prepare to move into a new one (this one with some land). Since the second place is in need of some renovation before we can really call it home, all of my computers, files, and thoughts have been scattered.

Today, catching up on my reading I found this week-old piece of blogged advice from John August that speaks well to my current status, and I wanted to share it with you (and with myself, for posterity’s sake). The following is in response to the question, Which project should I write?

If you have four ideas, all equally viable, I’d recommend writing the one that has the best ending. That’s the one you’ve thought through the most, and the one you’re least likely to abandon midway. But whatever you do, just pick one and write it without delay. If you have great ideas for your other projects, absolutely take some notes, but don’t switch. Finish what you’re doing, or you’ll have a folder full of first acts.

The full post can be found here.